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Rajasthan: Gross carelessness in delivery, baby’s body splits into two

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In case of gross negligence during the delivery by medical personnel in the government hospital of Ramgarh district Jaisalmer, a newborn baby’s body was split into two, when medical staff pulled it out with brute force during delivery.

The, Human Rights Commission Chairman Prakash Tatia has taken congizance of the case and has sought factual report from Jaisalmer SP and CMHO till February 11. Health Minister Raghu Sharma has also directed a probe into the matter and has sought the report in 7 days.

Incidentally, in this heartbreaking episode, the woman’s delivery was done by two male nurses in the Ramgarh Hospital. One nurse  allegedly yanked at the child’s feet and the other tried to deliver the child forcefully resulting in the child’s trunk separating from the head, sources said.

The medical staff did not tell the family and the woman was referred to Jaisalmer. From there, she was sent to Jodhpur to Ummed Hospital, where the head of the baby was taken out by doctors and only then the case of this negligence was revealed.

After the shocking disclosure, the woman’s husband filed a case against the hospital staff at the Ramgarh police station, sources said.

According to information received from Ramgarh, Diksha, wife of Trilok Singh Bhati, was taken to the hospital three days earlier when she was in labour.

When the male nurses reportedly blundered during the delivery of child, they made the cardinal sin of not informing the parents of the case and instead, referred the matter to the Jaisalmer hospital. The patient and the family were not informed about this, and Jaisalmer Hospital referred the matter to Jodhpur hospital saying that a dead child was born  but the umbilical cord was left behind.

Dr Ravindra Sankhala,  doctor at Jawahar Hospital in Jaisalmer was informed by the Ramgarh hospital staff that the woman delivered a child, but the cord is left inside. At one o’clock at night, Dr Sankhala tried to remove the umbilical cord, but when he sensed something is amiss, he decided to first stabilize the health of the woman and then referred her to Jodhpur.Doctors at Jodhpur’s Umaid Hospital got to know about the botch-up during operation and informed her husband, who then approached police.A case was filed under IPC sections 304 A (causing death by negligence) and 336 (act endangering life or personal safety) against two staffers of the Ramgarh hospital.

Diksha said that when she was brought to the hospital for childbirth, there was no doctor there, nor were any female nurses present. Only two male nurses were on duty there she said before speaking of her ordeal.

She said the male nurses told her to leave for Jaisalmer Hospital after the botch-up.

Police have started the investigation by registering the case. When the medical staff were interrogated, the police were handed over the part of the body. Today the police has conducted the post-mortem of the child’s head and body at Ramgarh hospital.

Health minister Dr Raghu Sharma said the incident was unfortunate and such things will not be tolerated. “I have asked district CMHO to investigate the matter and file the factual report within 7 days. Strict action will be taken against those who would be found guilty.” he said.

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Nisha Shiwani hails from the pink city of Jaipur and is a prolific writer. She loves to write on Real Estate/Property, Automobiles, Education, Finance and about the latest developments in the Technology space.



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To a healthier life

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Japanese surprising research…….

1. Acidity not only caused by diet errors but more dominated because of stress.

2. Hypertension not only caused by too much consumption of salty foods but mainly because of errors in managing emotions.

3. Cholesterol is not only caused by fatty foods, but excessive laziness is more responsible.

4. Asthma not only because of the disruption of oxygen supply to the lungs, but often sad feelings make lungs unstable.

5. Diabetes not only because of too much consumption of glucose, but selfish & stubborn attitude disrupts the function of the pancreas.

The true cause of any disease are :
Spiritual 50%
Psychic 25%
Social 15%
Physical 10%

If we want to be healthy…
… fix our mind & … FOR THAT
….Do regular Exercises,
….Do pranayam,
….Do meditation
…which will strengthen our soul & mind
….Don’t search a reason for not getting time for this
…if u don’t find time then it proves that you are lazy….isn’t it?

…. It is after all your choice whether to invite all the above diseases or to strengthen by adopting Exercises & Meditation practices……

Wishing you a Healthy active lifestyle😊

This helpful article curated from the web.

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Health minister Dr. Harshvardhan directs to give up biscuits

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The union health minister Dr. Harvardhan himself being a senior medical doctor of repute seeems to be more concerned and careful about his health, health of his subordinate bureaucrats and departmental heads as according to him biscuits are harmful for the health than other desi stuff like bhuna chana and expensive dry fruits. Biscuits perhaps being a cheaper stuff does not suit the VIPs and bureaucrats of repute serving in top positions in ministry of health and family welfare who attend and participate in important routine meetings with the minister of health in his official chamber and in other meetings as well.

Sounds interesting that for such a change in the menu of snacks an official order is circulated by the deputy secretary to the government of India namely Zile Singh Vical, instructing the Canteen staff to do the needful forthwith mentioning the reference of the union health minister’s directives to this effect. WOW. In an official circular on dated 19th June, signed by Zile Singh Vical on 24th June, 2019 sent to Manager Departmental Canteen, Ministry of Health and family Welfare, Nirman Bhawan, and and protocol section as well including Principal Private Secretary to Secretary Health, all joint secretaries, DDG’s, DCAs, Director CGH n Chief Director ( Stats), all directors, deputy secretaries, under secretaries, section officers and notice board of the department at Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi it has been mentioned that hon’ble health and family welfare minister has desired that healthy snacks are only to be served in the official meetings and biscuits are to be avoided.

Henceforth therefore biscuits shall not be dispensed through the departmental canteens and healthy snacks only like Lahiya Chana, Khazoor, Bhuna Chana, ( fried grams) dry fruits Almonds, Akhrot etc will be served in the official meetings in the department. Further the order issued by the administration division for not using plastic water bottles shall also be imolemented in letter and spirit.

The subject of the corcular is : Serving of biscuits through the departmental canteen of department of health and family welfare to be dispensed with – instruction thereoff.

However it dosent mentions giving up the usage of plastic wayer bottles in the department more specifically than adding it in the last sentence of the circular as a secondary issue which should infact have been the primary point of the directives. What’s your take friends?

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SCORCHING SUMMER AND SWEET & SUCCULENT FRUITS

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Summer comes in many ways. But the most appalling summary of the season is the scorching weather as if God has made up his mind to give no respite to the dwellers on the earth. Amidst such tough times, something which provides a soothing and satiating smile is the varied and succulent fruits. Fruit fanatic always feels gung ho in summer to see such scrumptious and scrummy fruits.

To begin our discussion of an obsession for fruits we must first visit the king of fruit i.e.; mango. India is the largest producer and exporter of mango across the globe.The juicy stone fruit comes in numerous varieties such as  Alphonos, Badami, Chaunsa, Dasheri, Kesar, Langra, Lengara, Hemsagar, Amrapali, Baganpali, Totapuri etc. Mango of India is famous in the world for its sweetness, richness, and uniqueness. It had a very interesting story of origin in India. The saple of the tree was brought from Afghanistan by the Mughal emperor the great Akbar and planted in a place called Lakhi Bagh in Uttar Pradesh. From then it has heightened its stature to recent time across the length and breadth of the world. It has achieved the status of the national fruit of India and at the same time the national tree of Bangladesh. It is also proclaimed unofficial as the national fruit of the Philippines. Summer without mango is colourless, odourless and sweet less.

To be candid no fruit can come closer to its taste, flavor, and fragrance, but in terms of presence, color and rough pericardium texture luscious lychee always capture the Fruit-hunter imagination and expectation.

The fruit has a very short life in comparison to the fleshy mango. There are few varieties come to mind in case of lychee but the most popular of them in India is Bengal lychee. The small rounded fruit with sweet white scented flesh and a large central stone and a thin reddish-pinkish morph augur well for the fruit lovers. The tropical fruit is very famous among children for its unique taste and flavor.

Moving on with our elaboration, another most attractive summer fruit is juicy watermelon. Without the succulent watermelon, the perching season is drained and enervated. Because of its price and popularity, it is a welcomed seasonal fruit in every section of society. The oval and round textured fruit has excellent refreshing quality and sweetness to surmount summer heat and provide a guilt-free, low maintenance dessert. The tropical fruit delicacy and refreshing attributes keep everyone hydrated throughout the perching and dreadful climate.

After discussing all the refreshing and relishing fruits we must move to another stunning summer specialty, the jack fruit. The studded fruit has an excellent economic value from its raw state to the ripen one. As the festivals in Odisha like the Savitri and Raja Sankranti are around the corner, it makes the center stage throughout the rural and urban market. Mostly circular its shape can be irregularly found between the Sahyadri and Borneo. Otherwise known as breadfruit is the national fruit of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka and the state fruit in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. The plant is well versed with tropical lowlands and its fruit is the largest tree-borne fruit, reaching as much 55kg in weight,90 cm in length and 50cm in diameter. A mature tree can produce up to 100 to 200 fruits in a year.

Summer fruits number do not finish with the jackfruit as the endless number continue such as the Wax Apple, Juicy Plums, Papaya, Pear, Sapeta, Raspberries, Blackberries, Blueberries, etc. Irrespective of unbearable and exhausting heat and humidity the diversified fruit and its flavor and fragrance give immense reason to smile for fruitarianism.

 

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Looking at anything which reminds of coffee can stimulate brain: Study

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The study, published in the journal ‘Consciousness and Cognition’ looked at an effect calling priming through which exposure to even subtle cues can influence people’s thoughts and behaviour.

“Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects. Much less is known about its psychological meaning — in other words, how even seeing reminders of it can influence how we think,” said study author Sam Maglio.

“People often encounter coffee-related cues, or think about coffee, without actually ingesting it. We wanted to see if there was an association between coffee and arousal such that if we simply exposed people to coffee-related cues, their physiological arousal would increase, as it would if they had actually drank coffee,” added Maglio.

Arousal in psychology refers to how specific areas of the brain get activated into a state of being alert, awake and attentive. It can be triggered by a number of things, including our emotions, neurotransmitters in the brain, or the caffeinated beverages we consume.

In this case, the researchers wanted to explore how simply being exposed to things that remind us of coffee may have an effect on arousal.

Across four separate studies and using a mix of participants from Western and Eastern cultures, they compared coffee- and tea-related cues. They found that participants exposed to coffee-related cues perceived time as shorter and thought in more concrete, precise terms.

“People who experience physiological arousal – again, in this case as the result of priming and not drinking coffee itself – see the world in more specific, detailed terms,” said Maglio.

“This has a number of implications for how people process information and make judgements and decisions,” Maglio added.

However, the effect was not as strong among participants who grew up in Eastern cultures. Maglio speculates that the association between coffee and arousal is not as strong in less coffee-dominated cultures.

Past research has looked at the effect of other primed associations, noted Maglio. One study specifically found that merely looking at the McDonald’s logo may lessen our ability to slow down and savour pleasurable experiences in life.

He says the research may be of interest in better understanding a range of consumer-related behaviours, and for marketers in considering retail store locations.

Next steps for the research will look at associations people have for different foods and beverages, researchers said. Just thinking about energy drinks or red wine, for example, could have very different effects on arousal

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Smoking in pregnancy raises infant’s obesity risk

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Children whose mothers smokedduring their pregnancy are at increased risk of being obese later in life, say researchers.

The findings, published in the journal Experimental Physiology, showed that chemerin, a protein that is produced by fat cells and appears to play a role in energy storage, was more prevalent in the skin and isolated cells of infants whose mothers smoked during pregnancy.

Previous research had shown that chemerin is present in higher levels in the blood of obese people.

The new results suggest that smoking in pregnancy could lead to changes in the regulation of the genes that play an important role in fat cell development and, by extension, obesity.

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Consumption of walnuts may help suppress growth and survival of breast cancer, study.

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Consumption of walnuts may help suppress growth and survival of breast cancer, a study claims.

The study, published in the journal Nutrition Research, found that consumption of two ounces of walnuts a day for about two weeks significantly changed gene expression in confirmed breast cancers.

“Consumption of walnuts has slowed breast cancer growth and reduced the risk of mammary cancer in mice,” said W Elaine Hardman, from Marshall University in the US.

“Building on this research, our team hypothesised that walnut consumption would alter gene expression in pathologically-confirmed breast cancers of women in a direction that would decrease breast cancer growth and survival,” Hardman said in a statement.

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Artificial Intelligence can Help Predict Premature Deaths: Study

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Researchers have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based system to predict the risk of early deaths due to chronic disease in middle-aged adults.

The study, published by PLOS ONE journal, found that the new AI Machine Learning models known as “random forest” and “deep learning” were very accurate in its predictions and performed better than the current standard approach to prediction developed by human experts.

Such new risk prediction models take into account demographic, biometric, clinical and lifestyle factors for each individual, and assess even their dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables and meat per day, said Stephen Weng, Assistant Professor at the University of Nottingham in Britain.

The traditionally-used “Cox regression” prediction model, based on age and gender, was found to be the least accurate at predicting mortality and also a multivariate Cox model which worked better but tended to over-predict risk.

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24 March: World Tuberculosis Day

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The World Tuberculosis (TB) Day was observed across the globe on March 24, 2019 with a goal to raise public awareness about the upsetting health and economic consequences of tuberculosis and to step up efforts to remove the global TB epidemic.

On the Day, President Ram Nath Kovind urged all stakeholders to come together to achieve a TB free India. He appealed to the people dedicate themselves towards achieving the goal.

India renewed its commitments and intentions to end TB by 2025, five years ahead of the global targets.

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), India achieved 84 percent decrease in tuberculosis deaths among people living with HIV by 2017.

It is the highest reported decline among over 20 nations and the achievement is also three years ahead of the 2020 target of reducing TB deaths among people living with HIV by 75 percent, as outlined in the 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on Ending AIDS.

According to the World Health Organisation estimates, globally, TB deaths among people living with HIV fell by 42 percent since 2010.

Tuberculosis: A Global Epidemic

Despite important steps taken to end the epidemic, Tuberculosis remains the world’s deadliest infectious killer as around 4500 people die every day due to TB and around 30000 people fall ill with this curable disease.

Majorly, the disease thrives among people living in poverty, communities and groups that are marginalized such as migrants, refugees, ethnic minorities, the elderly, marginalised women and children.

In 2017, WHO recorded that 10.4 million people fell ill with TB and there were 1.8 million TB deaths in 2016.

The Global concentrated efforts undertaken to fight TB have been successful in saving around 54 million lives since 2000 and reduced the TB mortality rate by 42 percent.

In September 2018, the global leaders came together and made commitments to end TB at the first-ever UN High Level Meeting.

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India achieves 84 % reduction in TB deaths among HIV patients says UN

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India has achieved an 84 per cent reduction in tuberculosis deaths among people living with HIV by 2017.

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on the UNAIDS, it is the highest recorded decline among over 20 nations and it is also three years ahead of the 2020 deadline.

UNAIDS has urged countries to step up action to meet the 2020 target of reducing TB deaths among people living with HIV by 75 per cent, as outlined in the 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on Ending AIDS.

World Health Organisation estimates show that globally, TB deaths among people living with HIV have fallen by 42 per cent since 2010.

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Research studies confirm Ayurvedic treatments help kidney ailments

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Two separate studies published in Internation journals by Indian researchers have confirmed benefits of using ‘Punarnava’, an Indian herb, for kidney ailments. The extract from the plant can help with both preventing and managing kidney disease, said researchers, and added that one can definitely help slow the disease’s progression and treats its symptoms and complications by using formulations containing ‘Punarnava’ and a careful diet.

According to a case study conducted in Banaras Hindu University (BHU) which has been published in the World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceuticals Sciences, a woman kidney patient was given Punarnava based syrup for a month. It was found that the creatinine level and urea level in her blood had gone down significantly to a healthy level. Not only this, but her hemoglobin level had also improved. Hence, it was concluded that Punanrva based drugs not only make the kidney’s health but also improves the hemoglobin level.

Similarly, another study published in the Indo American Journal of Pharmaceutical Research too talked about the efficacy of Punarnava based herbal formulations including lotus leaves, patharchur, and other major herbs when given to the subjects. It was found that the drug had helped in maintaining a histological parameter of kidneys, apart from reducing high levels of uric acid and electrolytes, The study said that “the syrup (Neeri KFT) is a potent neuroprotective formulation, protecting kidneys from nephrotoxins including oxidative damage induced by lead acetate.”

“Herbal formulations in Neeri KFT can be an alternative to dialysis to some extent. In fact, because of limited options in allopathy for kidney treatment, which is witnessing increasing trend due to changing lifestyles, now the emphasis is on Ayurveda drugs,” said Professor KN Dwivedi, Head of Department, Department of Dravyaguna, BHU.

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a global epidemic. Nearly 850 million people are known to suffer from kidney diseases from varied causes, worldwide. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) causes about 2.4 million deaths per year and is among the top five causes of deaths worldwide. India contributes to around 10% of the CKD burden of the world. The estimated prevalence of CKD is 1 in 10 (10%)  in India. The most common cause of Chronic Kidney disease in India is Diabetes mellitus, which contributes to around 55-60% of CKD.

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