Tags Posts tagged with "protection"

protection

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. The content on the web ranges from inappropriate or adult content to unkind and simply rude comments.

Internet is filled with enough content and of such varied genre that it could be horror for adults and an amusement park for children. The content on the web ranges from inappropriate or adult content to unkind and simply rude comments to dangerous predators. You might want to look out for the last one.

Even after all these disadvantages is also provides opportunities to socialize with others and to learn or create. From now on trying to keep your children off of the internet would be futile. It would be like keeping them away from food or electricity. They’re bound to get online with or without your consent. Your job here in this case is to help them in taking good decisions when they are on the web.

There do exist some parent-friendly routers that you can buy, and software that you might want to use, to limit the access of your children to the internet and keep an eye on them. But even if we ignore the fact that this idea is not completely efficient, you need to create a mental framework that can keep your children safe online.

You might want to put more thought into this because there are no concrete rules governing children and the internet because of the fact that no two children are exactly alike. This exercise is just like keeping children safe after their homecoming. Some children might only need a curfew of some sorts, others a heavy grounding. Children in different age groups require different amounts of oversight and rules. Even within a specific age group, different children can have different inclinations and interests, and with them comes the problem of different needs.

Some legal guidelines do exist. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule was established in 1998, it creates various safeguards like keeping children under the age of 13 off of social media. Facebook has very recently attempted to outsmart the law with a version of its Messenger aimed at children of 6 years of age and above.

Problem is, even after such laws have been in force, millions of children under 13 years of age have found their way onto Facebook over the years, with or without parental consent. You need to buckle up and don’t give your consent as a parent. The rules are there for a reason.

The more you feed the sense of responsibility and rules to your children the dividends you will receive over the years will be larger. As the children grow they will find ways around any parental controls that are put over them. Your goal is to make sure that there is no need at all for such restrictions.

When and if you give your kid a smartphone, it is your responsibility to help them through the process of setup. You need to make sure that they know exactly how to create a strong password, and you need to establish strict ground rules over which kind of applications can the kid download.

You need to make sure that you are a good example to them. It is no good if they complain that you don’t spend enough time with them due to always being hooked on that smartphone or tablet of yours. Critically examine your own digital habits. This goes for not only the amount of time you spend on your devices but also for how you maintain them. If you keep up with standard security practices, like keeping strong passwords and updating your software, it would be beneficial for the whole family in the end.

You need do make rules about device usage for the whole family. Help your kids when they run into trouble, this way they can go on to help their friends by themselves.

It’s pretty easy for parents to track every text message and know every single app that their kids use, but that’s not the best solution. If they are surfing over non dangerous areas, keeping their grades up and have a good social circle you don’t need to meddle in their online habits at all. The key here is to communicate.

This way, if and when they do run into a trouble online, may it be harassment or some disturbing content, you’ll be the person the children would come to for help. This is way better than them looking for a solution on the internet.

 

-Archit

 

 

205
A password is not very useful if someone can simply crack it by guessing or by looking over your shoulder.

Passwords are your first line of defence against any internet threat. Sadly very few people recognise this fact.  Though the passwords are not the perfect security solution, if you put in some more effort they can provide a great security boost to your online and offline systems.

In any case, a password is not very useful if someone can simply crack it by guessing or by looking over your shoulder. So, here are some security tips that can be kept in mind while compiling a high security password.

  • You can use a password manager to create a password: A good password manager can create strong and unique password for any and all of your accounts. This means that if one of your passwords is leaked in a data breach any person with a harmful intent would still have to struggle with other online services and subscriptions. The best password managers are those which sync across desktop and mobile. You could even remember just one key, rather than having to memorize more than dozens of long and complicated passwords.
  • Choose a longer password: In the case of passwords’ security, length matters more than the complexity of the combination. Once you have extended it to 12-15 character range, it will become way harder for a hacker to guess or crack it solely on the basis of brute force. And try to use some special characters rather than using the name of your favourite band.
  • You can keep the special characters apart: You have to keep in mind not to bunch together special characters like !,@,#,$,% etc. This is exactly what people do and this means that this is what the potential threats are looking for. To make the guesswork extra tricky you have to space them apart.
  • Don’t change the passwords too regularly: This is a tricky one. But keep in mind that the less often you change your password, the less likely you are to forget it. You may even fall into a pattern, like changing only a number at the end each time you update your password. This only makes it easier to crack the password.
  • Single purpose passwords only: At the very least you need to make sure that you don’t use the same passwords across different online services and accounts. If you do this then a retailer breach that you have no control over could cost you your most confidential banking password.
  • Never to trust your browser with passwords: A convenient shortcut that everyone falls into habit of using is to let your browser remember them for you. You must have seen the option yourself. I can even bet that you use it on at least one site. Don’t use it anymore. The option for the browser to remember the passwords is really convenient, but the taxing of security is very high. If you really need a free and easy option, go with a good and respectable password manager instead of trusting everything to your browser.
  • Enable OTP protection wherever it is possible: In these days of ever increasing online security threats, not even a password is enough to safeguard your privacy. Many of the services like, commercial banks, Google, etc. offer another layer of protection. This protection can come in the form of a numeric code that is sent to your phone via SMS. This is more than enough for most people. Just keep in mind that this is also not completely foolproof.

 

-Archit